Rare Nephrology News

Disease Profile

Dissociative seizures

Prevalence
Prevalence estimates on Rare Medical Network websites are calculated based on data available from numerous sources, including US and European government statistics, the NIH, Orphanet, and published epidemiologic studies. Rare disease population data is recognized to be highly variable, and based on a wide variety of source data and methodologies, so the prevalence data on this site should be assumed to be estimated and cannot be considered to be absolutely correct.

Unknown

Age of onset

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ICD-10

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Inheritance

Autosomal dominant A pathogenic variant in only one gene copy in each cell is sufficient to cause an autosomal dominant disease

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Autosomal recessive Pathogenic variants in both copies of each gene of the chromosome are needed to cause an autosomal recessive disease and observe the mutant phenotype

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X-linked
dominant X-linked dominant inheritance, sometimes referred to as X-linked dominance, is a mode of genetic inheritance by which a dominant gene is carried on the X chromosome.

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X-linked
recessive Pathogenic variants in both copies of a gene on the X chromosome cause an X-linked recessive disorder

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Mitochondrial or multigenic Mitochondrial genetic disorders can be caused by changes (mutations) in either the mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA that lead to dysfunction of the mitochondria and inadequate production of energy.

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Multigenic or multifactor Inheritance involving many factors, of which at least one is genetic but none is of overwhelming importance, as in the causation of a disease by multiple genetic and environmental factors.

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Not applicable

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Other names (AKA)

Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures; Psychogenic seizures; Pseudoseizures;

Summary

Dissociative or psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are involuntary episodes of movement, sensation, or behaviors (vocalizations, crying, and other expressions of emotion) that do not result from abnormal brain discharges. The seizures can look like any kind of epileptic seizure. They are somatic manifestations (physical symptoms) of psychologic distress. Psychiatric conditions associated with PNES include depression, anxiety, somatoform disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, dissociative disorder, and personality disorders. Treatment depends on the cause of the psychologic distress, and may involve cognitive behavioral therapy or psychotherapy, as well as antidepressive medication.[1][2]

References

  1. Alsaadi TM & Marquez AV. Psychogenic Nonepileptic Seizures. American Family Physicians. 2005; 72(5):849-856. https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0901/p849.html.
  2. Ettinger AB. Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. UpToDate. April, 2016; https://www.uptodate.com/contents/psychogenic-nonepileptic-seizures.